Harumi and Ryutaro

Harumi and Ryutaro

This discussion between Harumi and Ryutaro shows again a relatively low speaking rate for Harumi and relatively high rate for Ryutaro. Acoustic dysfluency is average, 5.8% or 37.3 seconds, and the conversation has no cross-talk pausing. It is quite animated, but there are too many minimal responses on the part of both. Harumi has 5.1 syllables syllables for her mean length runs while Ryutaro has 9.5. Again the mail dominates in the number of words produced with 371 and 205, and there is a bit too much repetition by both of the participants. This goes to show that while an interchange can be quite animated, the actual fluency can be quite low. The dysfluency is hidden by the minimal responses on the part of both participants.

Ryotaro and Toko

Ryotaro and Toko

Ryotaro is now talking with Toko, and in this discussion is they are discussing their favorite person. As both are in space technology, the two hit it off and the discourse is animated. Again, Toko produces far more words than her male counterpart, with 473 compared to Ryotaro’s 374, so this is rather refreshing to see. Acoustic dysfluency is low, 1.0% percent silence for overall discussion, and cross-talking pausing is non-existent. Lexical dysfluency is low, but in syntactic dysfluency, there is a high level of repetition, 42, for Ryotaro and 59 for Toko, likewise there is also a high level of meaningless syllables. MLRs are average. Minimal responses were low, and this was good to see.

Ryotaro and Kaho

Ryotaro and Kaho

Ryotaro is now meeting Kaho and while cross-talk pausing is noted (16.5 seconds) Kaho seems far more comfortable talking with Ryotaro, though the overall amount of silence for the entire interaction is still high, 57.5 second, or 7.1%.  Speaking rate is average for Ryotaro, but is quite low for Kaho, 50.4. Lexical dysfluency is low though some L1 is used. As for syntactic dysfluency, Ryotaro has high MLRs (14.9) but Kaho’s are average, 10.7. Again, we see, in regard to production, the males producing a far high number of words, Ryotaro’s 413 to Kaho’s 279. Meaningless syllables are slightly high. In short, both participants were more relaxed but had to think through their answers regarding their most important things in life.

Toko and Takumi

Toko and Takumi

Takumi is now talking with Toko in his second gendered discussion. This one is quite different from his interaction with Kaho. The discussion is very animated and Toko is thoroughly engaged and interested, particularly when discussing music. This also is one of the few interactions that shows the female actually having more production, with Toko having 598 words compared to Takumi’s 374. Acoustic dysfluency is minimal, very little silence noted (0.3% for overall discussion!), and with lexical dysfluency only the moderate use of L1 is noted. For syntactic dysfluency, there is a high level of repetition for both participants, 45 for Toko and 59 for Takumi, and MLRs are average 12.8 for Toko but Takumi’s is rather on the low side, 8.4.

Takumi and Kaho

Takumi and Kaho

Kaho and Takumi have a rather awkward conversation with a very high rate of silence 18.7%. At times it seems that Kaho is extremely uncomfortable in talking with Takumi, and both participants have high rates of silence 62.4 for Takumi and 54.2 for Kaho. While the topic of exercise and sports is one that Takumi seems to delight in, it doesn’t seem apparent that Kaho has any knowledge or interest in the topic until later on when she does show some knowledge, in talking about her previous ballet experience and knowledge of baseball. As for acoustic dysfluency, there is high rate of cross-talk pausing 19.2 seconds, with several micropauses with Takumi. Takumi has a 12.2 second mean length pause rate as compared to Kaho, indicating that he is apparently at his wits end in trying to get responses from Kaho. Lexical dysfluency is only high with the use of L2, with Takumi having 23 occurrences.

Yuki and Nanami

Yuki and Nanami

This discussion between Yuki and Nanami shows, again, the tendency for males to dominate gendered discussions. Yuki’s speaking rate is 100.9 while Nanami’s is 49.3; likewise, Yuki’s number of words is 462 while Nanami’s is 285.While the amount of silence is low 6.6%, Nanami has 39.9 seconds compared to Yuki’s 0 seconds. Lexical and syntactic dysfluency is average, though Yuki does have a high level of repetition with him repeating “yes” too often. I would recommend that women take some time to see how they can be better engaged and proactive in such discussions.

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